500 E. San Antonio
Suite 101
El Paso, Texas 79901
Phone (915) 546-2143
Fax (915) 546-2019
mbanales@epcounty.com

Council of Judges Administration

Job Descriptions

Certified Court Reporter
Court Interpreter
Roving Court Reporters
Jury Court
Bailiff
Booking Bailiff
Jury Panel Bailiff
Caseworker

  • Certified Court Reporter
  •  
  • A Certified Court Reporter is a sworn officer of the court who attends all sessions of the court and takes full shorthand notes of all proceedings of said sessions, preserving the shorthand notes until requested to produce a verbatim transcript of the same.
  •  
  • When in court, the reporter takes full shorthand notes of oral testimony offered before the court, objections made to the admissibility of evidence, court rulings and remarks on the objections, and exceptions to the rulings; closing arguments, objections to the arguments; reads portions of shorthand notes to resolve disputes of testimony, argument, or matters of law upon request of the trial court.
  •  
  • As per statutory guidelines, preserves all shorthand notes for future reference, files all exhibits or necessary documents with the Clerk of the Court; furnishes a verbatim transcript of the reported evidence, including necessary exhibits or documents.
  •  
  • The reporter uses computer-aided transcription equipment, dictation equipment and/or the ability to perform real-time transcriptions.
  •  
  • The reporter must be a currently certified shorthand reporter as recognized by the supreme court of texas; must have at least two years experience as a full time certified shorthand reporter; a high school graduate or equivalent, attendance of/ or graduation from a court reporting college or court reporting school.
  •  
  • Must have the ability to deal with supreme court justices, appellate court justices, district court and county court at law judges, court masters, attorneys, parties to a lawsuit, jurors, and the public; must have extensive knowledge of appellate court rules pertaining to the duties of the office; knowledge of legal and medical terminology and knowledge of the court system.
  •  
  • Visit the National Court Reporters Association's (NCRA) web site www.ncraonline.org or (800)272-6272 for more information.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Court Interpreters
  •  
  • The Council of Judges has eight official interpreters. their services are required in District, County Courts at Law, Family Law Courts, Jail Magistrate, Impact Court, Tax Court, and Probate Court along with the Grand Jury and Jury Panel qualification sessions.
  •  
  • Interpreters render their services verbatim in simultaneous and consecutive modes from spanish into english and english into spanish.
  •  
  • These services are provided for the benefit of the court and/or jury, defendants and witnesses during hearings and trials. in addition, the Interpreter translates legal documents, tapes, videos and other evidentiary material ordered by the court or requested by a county department to be used in trials.
  •  
  • During a criminal trial, if the defendant does not speak english, the Interpreter provides his/her services during the entire trial. in a civil case, services are provided only when a witness or the attorney's client is on the stand. the interpreters also cover the Juvenile Probation Department. Interpreters render services to the minors and their parents since juvenile court requires parents or the legal guardian to be present at all juvenile hearings. the regular working hours for an Interpreter are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon-Fri. on some occasions, an Interpreter must be in before 8:00 a.m. or stay after 5:00 p.m. and if required, be in court on weekends to continue with a trial.
  •  
  • The job qualifications require a college degree, preferably in languages, or several years of experience in the field of a Texas Court interpreter license. candidates must have working knowledge of street slang, jailhouse slang, legal, medical, business and technical vocabulary. for more information to obtain a license, www.license.state.tx.us or call (800) 803-9202.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Roving Court Reporters
  •  
  • The Court Reporters are assigned to any of the 33 courts, including the grand jury, that require a record. The reporters must be certified. The reporters assist the court when the court's regular reporter is on vacation, out sick, at a seminar or at times, when the court is running a double docket.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Jury Court
  •  
  • This staff handles the jury paneling of potential jurors, line up the jurors to their assigned courts, answer questions that the jurors or public may have; mail out the questionnaires and summons. The staff is located at Liberty Hall, across from the courthouse.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Bailiff
  •  
  • The main responsibility of each Court Bailiff is to protect the Judge.
  •  
  • The Bailiff maintains courtroom security and control of jury members, as well as the prosecutors, defense attorneys, witnesses, court participants and spectators. during a trial, the Bailiff is responsible for the care of the Jurors, sequestering, parking, certificates of jury service and jury meals.
  •  
  • During hearings and criminal trials, the Bailiff is in charge of the prisoners, whether keeping them in the courtroom, locked up in the cell or transporting them to the jail when ordered by the Judge.
  •  
  • Some Bailiffs are given the assignment of ordering supplies for the court, retrieving civil/criminal files for hearings in court and perform other reasonable job-related duties as directed by the Judge.
  •  
  • The Bailiff may be a licensed peace officer in the state of texas, have knowledge of court rules, at least two years experience as a Peace Officer, and have the ability to deal with people.
  • back to top
  • Booking Bailiff
  •  
  • The Booking Bailiff is under the Council of Judges Administration. their main responsibility is to book the defendants upon the judges orders or as necessary, to take and process the defendants for booking at the jail.
  •  
  • When filling in for one of the regular Court Bailiffs, the Booking Bailiff is responsible for the protection of the Judge, maintain courtroom security and control of jury members, prosecutors, defense attorneys, witnesses, court participants and spectators.
  •  
  • When assigned to a jury trail, the Bailiff maintains control of jury members and related needs of the jury, i.e., sequestering, parking, certificates of jury service, meals, etc., and performs any other job-related duties as directed.
  •  
  • The Booking Bailiff is a licensed peace officer in the State of Texas, who must have knowledge of court rules and at least two years experience as a Peace Officer.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Jury Panel Bailiff/Coordinator
  •  
  • The Jury Panel Balifff/Coordinator is appointed by the District Judges and serves a two-year term beginning January 1st of each odd-numbered year.
  •  
  • The Bailiff takes care of the general panel and performs the duties in connection with the supervision of the central jury room and the general panel that are required by the District Judges; serve notices on absent jurors as directed by the District Judges having control of the general jury panel; assist the jury room clerks in scanning the questionnaires that are returned by prospective jurors; assists in scanning the jurors who were summoned to liberty hall at 8:30 a.m. to verify attendance; prepare the appropriate number of copies of each questionnaire and help deliver them to the appropriate court by 3:00 p.m. on friday before the trial.
  •  
  • This position does not need to be a Peace Officer to hold the duty of Bailiff, but must have knowledge of court rules and have the ability to deal with people.
  •  
  • back to top
  • Caseworker
  •  
  • The Jail Magistrate has two caseworkers who interview defendants and inmates for Court Appointed Attorneys to ensure these individuals meet indigent qualifications of the County Indigence Program for court appointed counsel.
  •  
  • The interviews are conducted in the office, courtrooms and both county jails. the caseworkers interview prisoners on a daily basis concerning their financial status when brought to the courts for an arraignment/pretrial hearing.
  •  
  • They investigate information given by the defendant to determine whether the defendant is indigent or not by meeting specific guidelines.
  •  
  • The caseworkers advise the court coordinators on a daily basis the eligibility status of the defendants scheduled for court hearings, as well as notify the Council of Judges Administration of defendants who qualify for a court appointed attorney.
  •  
  • back to top